Space Shuttle Columbia

AP Photo: NASA
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The crew

A look back at the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster, 10 years later See gallery

The crew of the Space Shuttle Columbia (from left): David Brown, Rick Husband, Laurel Clark, Kalpana Chawla, Michael Anderson, William McCool and Israeli astronaut Ilan Ramon.

 

AP Photo: John Raoux
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Students pay their respects to the fallen astronauts

Noa Assa, front, along with fellow students from the Mekif Alef High School in Beer Sheva, Israel, place flowers on a gate in front of the Space Mirror Memorial at the Kennedy Space Center.

AP Photo: John Raoux
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Widows embrace during a remembrance service

Sandra Anderson, left, widow of astronaut Michael P. Anderson, and Evelyn Husband-Thompson, widow of Colonel Rick Husband, space shuttle Columbia commander, embrace in front of a memorial wreath.

AP Photo: Chris O'Meara
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The final launch

The Space Shuttle Columbia lifts off from the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., on Jan. 16, 2003.

AP Photo: Dr. Scott Lieberman
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Debris falls from the sky

Debris from the Space Shuttle Columbia streaks across the sky over Tyler, Texas.

AP Photo: J. Scott Applewhite
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Addressing the nation

President George H.W. Bush stands quietly in the Cabinet Room of the White House after his televised response to the nation of the space shuttle crash.

AP Photo: Aijaz Rahi
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News travels across the globe

People gather in front of a television set to watch the news about Space Shuttle Columbia in Bombay, India.

AP Photo: Evan Vucci
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Flags at half-staff

Flags at the Washington Monument fly at half-staff following the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster.

AP Photo: Scott Audette
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Stricken with grief

United Space Alliance employees console each other inside the vehicle assembly building at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., after hearing about the breakup of the Space Shuttle Columbia over Texas.

AP Photo: Rick Bowmer
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Johnson Space Center memorial

An American flag blows near a memorial at the entrance to the Johnson Space Center in Houston on Feb. 4, 2003.

AP Photo: NASA
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The crew floating around

 This photo provided by NASA shows crew members in the SPACEHAB Research Double Module aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. On Feb. 1, 2003.

AP Photo: Damian Dovarganes
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'I want to be an Astronaut'

Heidi Traxler, 37, reads "I Want to Be an Astronaut," to her nieces and nephews: Jenna, 6, Will , 4, and Lucy Abele, 3, at the children's space library at the California Science Center's Air and Space Gallery, in Los Angeles on Feb. 1, 2003.

AP Photo: David J. Phillip
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Searching for debris

Searchers, some armed with GPS transceivers, pass a makeshift memorial while searching for debris from the Space Shuttle Columbia outside Hemphill, Texas.

AP Photo: David J. Phillip
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Looking for space shuttle debris

Searchers look for fallen debris from Space Shuttle Columbia outside Hemphill, Texas.

AP Photo: Peter Cosgrove
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Scientists examine debris

Members of the Space Shuttle Columbia reconstruction team examine a tile from the orbiter's left wing at a hangar at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla.

AP Photo: Chris O'Meara
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How wing tiles handle heat

A small sample of a space shuttle tile glows during a demonstration by Kennedy Space Center's Visitor Center educationalist Jeff Lucas on Feb. 3, 2003.

AP Photo: NASA
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Debris during takeoff

In a video image released by NASA, at approximately 80-84 seconds after liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia, a large piece of debris is observed striking the underside of the left wing.

AP Photo: J. Scott Applewhite
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An astronaut's casket

The flag-draped casket of Space Shuttle Columbia astronaut Laurel Clark is carried by an honor guard at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va., on March 10, 2003.

AP Photo: Pablo Monsivais
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The President tears up

President H.W. Bush wipes his face before making remarks while first lady Laura Bush looks on during memorial service for the seven astronauts who perished aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia over the skies of Texas.

AP Photo: Charles Rex Arbogast
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Mourners in Houston

Mourners visit the main gate of the Johnson Space Center in Houston bringing items for the family and crew of Space Shuttle Columbia.

Reuters: NASA
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Columbia's first flight

The Space Shuttle Columbia takes off at Kennedy Space Center on April 12, 1981, for the first orbital flight of the space shuttle program.