Boston Marathon aftermath

MSN News | Reuters: Shannon Stapleton
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People honor the victims of the bombing

Two bombs exploded near the finish line of the 117th Boston Marathon in Boston's Back Bay neighborhood on Monday, killing three and injuring more than 170. Authorities continued the investigation on Tuesday. See gallery

People stand during a vigil honoring the victims of the Boston Marathon bombings at the Boston Common in Boston, Massachusetts on Tuesday.

Reuters: Adrees Latif
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A man prays at a make shift memorial in Boston

A man kneels praying in front of a make shift memorial on Boylston Street a day after two explosions hit the Boston Marathon.

Getty Images: Darren McCollester
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Investigators look for clues

Investigators in white jumpsuits one of the bomb sites on Boylston Street following yesterday's bomb attack at the Boston Marathon.

AP Photo: Elise Amendola
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Investigators at the scene of the first bomb

People in hazardous materials suits investigate the scene at the first bombing on Boylston Street in Boston near the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon

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Runners embrace

Boston Marathon runners Lisa Kresky-Griffin, Diane Deigmann and Tammy Snyder embrace Tuesday at the barricaded entrance at Boylston Street, near the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

 

 

Getty Images: Darren McCollester
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The Boston Globe

Newspapers are on sale at a Newbury Street stand on Tuesday in Boston. Security is especially tight in Boston in the aftermath of the bombings.

 

 

AP Photo: Elise Amendola
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Scene of the blast

One of the blast sites on Boylston Street near the marathon finish line is seen in Boston on Tuesday. FBI agents searched a suburban Boston apartment overnight and appealed to the public for amateur video and photos that might yield clues to who carried out the Boston Marathon bombing.

 

 

Reuters: Brian Snyder
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Leaving flowers

Two people leave flowers on the doorstep of 8-year-old Martin Richard's home in the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston on Tuesday. Richard was one of the victims who died in the explosions that hit the Boston Marathon as runners crossed the finish line on Monday. Two others, still unidentified by authorities, also died.     

 

 

 

 

AP Photo: Charles Krupa
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Finding more bags

Workers find bags containing runners' personal effects to return to their owners near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on Tuesday, one day after explosions killed three and injured more than 170 near the course's end. The bombs that blew up seconds apart at the finish line of one of the world's most storied races left the streets spattered with blood and glass as well as gaping questions of who chose to attack the marathon and why.

 

 

Reuters: Shannon Stapleton
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Boylston Street remembers

People embrace at Boylston Street near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on Tuesday. Two bombs packed with ball bearings tore through crowds near the finish line, killing three people and triggering a massive hunt for those behind an attack the White House said would be treated as "an act of terror."

 

 

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Sign of support

Claire Schaeffer Dufy walks with a sign she made to support her runner husband, Scott, near the scene of a twin bombing at the Boston Marathon.

 

 

 

 

Getty Images: Spencer Platt
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Reflection near the scene

People have breakfast Tuesday at a Boston cafe near the scene of a twin bombing that occurred Monday at the Boston Marathon.

 

 

 

 

Reuters: Brian Snyder
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Peace for Martin

Jacqueline Myers and her 10-year-old daughter Amira walk away after leaving a teddy bear on the doorstep of 8-year-old Martin Richard's home in the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston on Tuesday. Amira Myers was a schoolmate of Martin Richard, one of the three victims killed when two explosions hit the Boston Marathon.

 

 

 

 

AP Photo: Michael Dwyer
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Community reports

Jane Sherman speaks with reporters about her neighbors, the Richard family, in the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston on Tuesday. Martin Richard, 8, died in the bombing on Monday.

 

 

AP Photo: Michael Dwyer
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Neighborhood embrace

Neighbors hug outside the home of the Richard family in the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston on Tuesday. Martin Richard, 8, was killed in Mondays bombing at the Boston Marathon.

 

 

AP Photo: Elise Amendola
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Officials respond

Boston Mayor Thomas Menino reacts as he, Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick listen to FBI Special Agent in Charge Richard DesLauriers (far right) speak during a news conference in Boston on Tuesday regarding two bombs that exploded in the street near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on Monday, killing at least three people and injuring more than 170.

 

 

Getty Images: Spencer Platt
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Standing guard

A Boston police officer stands guard Tuesday near the scene of a twin bombing at the Boston Marathon.

AP Photo: Elise Amendola
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Perimeter secured

Boston police officers secure the perimeter in Copley Square on Tuesday as an investigation continues into the bomb blasts at the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

 

 

 

 

Getty Images: Spencer Platt
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Standing at the gate

A runner stands at a security gate Tuesday near the scene of a twin bombing at the Boston Marathon.

 

 

 

 

AP Photo: Charles Krupa
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Boylston Street

Paul McRae, a native of New Zealand now living in Jacksonville, Fla., takes a photograph of an empty Boylston Street near the Boston Marathon finish line on Tuesday. McRae finished the race before the explosions.

 

 

Reuters: Brian Snyder
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At Martin's doorstep

Boston Marathon runner Megan Cloke pauses after leaving flowers on the doorstep of 8-year-old Martin Richard's home in Dorchester on Tuesday.

 

 

 

 

Reuters: Shannon Stapleton
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Runner's respect

Alison Gardner lays flowers at the barricaded entrance at Boylston Street near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on Tuesday.

 

 

Reuters: Shannon Stapleton
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Flowers to remember

Flowers are seen at the barricaded entrance at Boylston Street near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on Tuesday.

 

 

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