Boston bombings: What we know

Two bombs exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, killing three people and injuring more than 200. Here's a look at the latest details of the investigation.

LATEST DEVELOPMENTS

  • Investigators believe the two Boston bombing suspects had planned to attack New York's Times Square with the rest of their explosives. New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Police Commissioner Ray Kelly on Thursday described the alleged plan as "spontaneous," and said it would have been deadly had the Tsarnaev brothers not been caught. The information was gleaned from questioning of the surviving brother, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, at a Boston hospital. Kelly said the two suspects had a pressure cooker bomb and five pipe bombs they wanted to set off in New York. 
  • The suspects' father says he plans to visit the United States in the next day or so. "I am going there to see my son and bury my older one," Anzor Tsarnaev told reporters in Makhachkala, Russia, on Thursday. The suspects' mother, Zubeidat Tsarnaeva, said she hasn't decided yet whether she will visit the U.S. as well. She was charged with shoplifting in the U.S. last summer, but said has been assured by lawyers that she would not be arrested if she comes to the U.S.

EARLIER DEVELOPMENTS

  • Dzhokhar Tsarnaev admitted his role in the bombing and then stopped talking after he was read his Miranda rights, a U.S. law enforcement source and officials told the AP.
  • A team of investigators from the U.S. Embassy in Moscow questioned both parents in Makhachkala this week.
  • The U.S. government added the name of Tamerlan Tsarnaev to a terrorist database 18 months before the deadly explosions, U.S. officials told The Associated Press.
  • Tamerlan Tsarnaev, his wife and their child received welfare benefits from the state up until last year, according to Massachusetts officials.
  • Vice President Joe Biden joined MIT students, faculty and staff, and law enforcement officials for a memorial service to honor slain MIT officer Sean Collier.

THE SUSPECTS

Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev were described by law enforcement officials as ethnic Chechens who grew up in Russia and came legally to the U.S.

Bombing suspects

View bombing suspect gallery

Militants from Chechnya and other restive provinces in Russia's volatile North Caucasus have targeted Moscow and other areas with bombings and hostage-takings, but there was no immediate indication that the brothers had any link to those insurgencies.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev: He was born in Kyrgyzstan and became a naturalized American citizen on Sept. 11, 2012, according to NBC News.

He attended the prestigious Cambridge Rindge and Latin school, participating on the wrestling team, and enrolled at the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth, Mass.

On Dzhokhar's page on the Russian social networking site Vkontakte, he described himself as speaking Chechen as well as English and Russian. His world view is described as "Islam" and he says his personal goal is "career and money."

Tamerlan Tsarnaev: He is the stockier one seen in video released to the public wearing a black baseball cap and khaki pants. Tamerlan was involved in martial arts and competed in boxing matches.

"I don't have a single American friend. I don't understand them." he was quoted as saying in a photo package that appeared in a Boston University student magazine in 2010.

He identified himself as a Muslim and said he did not drink or smoke. He said he was studying at Bunker Hill Community College to become an engineer.

 BACKGROUND  

The Boston Marathon attack: Two bombs exploded about 10 seconds and 100 yards apart at about 2:50 p.m. on Monday, April 15, in Boston's Copley Square, near the finish line of the marathon. Authorities believe the bombs used were fashioned out of kitchen pressure cookers packed with explosives, nails, ball bearings and metal shards.

The bombing victims: Three people were killed: 8-year-old Martin Richard29-year-old Krystle Campbell and Boston University graduate student Lu Lingzi of China.More than 200 people were hurt.

A few days later, MIT police officer Sean Collier was shot to death in his cruiser, and a Boston transit police officer was wounded in a shootout.  

More from MSN News:

Mayor: Boston suspect said NYC was next

Officials: Bomb suspect silent after read rights

Marathon bombing suspect had been on welfare

Planning for Boston Marathon security included bombing scenario

Slain MIT officer memorialized at campus service

 

The Associated Press and Reuters contributed to this report.

 

 

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