Rescue complex a haven for 1,500 orphaned animals

Associated Press | AP Photo: Reed Saxon
1 of 11 To full screen

Happy horses at DELTA Rescue complex

DELTA (Dedication & Everlasting Love to Animals) Rescue complex is the largest no-kill sanctuary in the US, giving a home to some 1,500 abandoned dogs, cats and horses. See gallery

Nearly 35 years ago, actor Leo Grillo thought he could get people to stop dumping dogs and cats in the forests and deserts of Southern California. After more than three decades, there is no end to the number of animals he finds discarded on the side of the road. DELTA Rescue is now the largest no-kill, care-for-life sanctuary in the nation for abandoned pets. Situated on115 hilltop acres in western Los Angeles County, the sanctuary is home to some 1,500 dogs, cats and horses and boasts an annual budget of $8 million, 50 employees, a state-of-the-art hospital with full-time veterinarian and a designated fire department. 

In this photo: Leo Grillo pats one horse while another, Max, tries to sneak a treat from a bag at Grillo's DELTA (Dedication & Everlasting Love to Animals) Rescue complex in Acton, Calif. on Aug. 29.

Read more: Actor creates largest US sanctuary for abandoned pets

AP Photo: Reed Saxon
2 of 11 To full screen

Three decades of providing sanctuary for animals

 Leo Grillo poses at his DELTA (Dedication & Everlasting Love to Animals) Rescue complex in Acton, Calif. on Aug. 29.

AP Photo: Reed Saxon
3 of 11 To full screen

A visit from the vet

Leo Grillo, center, his former wife and veterinary assistant Stacy Grillo, and veterinarian Dr. Gaylord Brown chat in an exam room at the fully-equipped veterinary hospital at his DELTA (Dedication & Everlasting Love to Animals) Rescue complex in Acton, Calif. 

AP Photo: Reed Saxon
4 of 11 To full screen

Veterinary care for rescue animals

Veterinarian Dr. Gaylord Brown, right, and assistant Stacy Grillo examine Mickey, a cat with diabetes, at Leo Grillo's DELTA (Dedication & Everlasting Love to Animals) Rescue complex in Acton, Calif. The sanctuary's hospital is equipped for surgeries, X-rays and anesthesia, with an in-house laboratory.

AP Photo: Reed Saxon
5 of 11 To full screen

Grillo and his feline friends

Leo Grillo plays with cats at his DELTA (Dedication & Everlasting Love to Animals) Rescue complex in Acton, Calif. on Aug. 29.

AP Photo: Reed Saxon
6 of 11 To full screen

DELTA's dozens of dog shelters

Leo Grillo sits atop one of dozens of dog shelters, made from bales of straw, plywood and stucco, at his DELTA (Dedication & Everlasting Love to Animals) Rescue complex.

AP Photo: Reed Saxon
7 of 11 To full screen

Splish splash!

Dogs have water in pools at Leo Grillo's DELTA (Dedication & Everlasting Love to Animals) Rescue complex in Acton, Calif. 

AP Photo: Reed Saxon
8 of 11 To full screen

DELTA's cat complex

Leo Grillo enters the cat complex at his animal sanctuary in Acton, Calif. 

AP Photo: Reed Saxon
9 of 11 To full screen

DELTA's own firefighting rigs

Leo Grillo poses with two of his firefighting rigs at his DELTA Rescue complex.

AP Photo: Reed Saxon
10 of 11 To full screen

Leo Grillo poses with Chaos, a rescue dog

Leo Grillo poses with Chaos, a 3-year-old dog rescued from Afghanistan, at his DELTA Rescue complex.

11 of 11