Outrageous customer service

By MSN News Getty Images for ACM: Angela Weiss
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Ways not to treat the customer

Papa John's is in the news after an unfortunate 'butt-dialing' incident. Of course, the pizza chain isn't the first company to find itself in hot water. See gallery

 

Papa John's

Papa John's Chairman and CEO John Schnatter wrote an apology on Facebook (read it) after a delivery driver in Sanford, Fla., inadvertently left a racist slur-laden voicemail on a customer's phone on May 26. The employee had "butt-dialed" the man while complaining to a coworker about the amount of his tip. The customer then posted video of the recorded message on YouTube, where it quickly went viral. Both pizza employees involved were fired.

Another employee was fired for racial incident

 

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Amy’s Baking Co.

Amy's Baking Co. owners Samy and Amy Bouzaglo — who first appeared on Gordon Ramsay's "Kitchen Nightmares" on May 10 — were so difficult to work with that the infamous chef "fired" them. The appearance led to not-so-nice comments on their Facebook page and Reddit threads, to which the couple responded using some not-so-professional words. The Scottsdale, Ariz., restaurateurs later claimed all of their social media accounts and website had been hacked. Since the public meltdown, it was revealed that Amy served time for bank fraud and Samy could be facing deportation.

Video: Watch the couple argue with Ramsay

 

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AP Photo: Amy Sancetta
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Abercrombie & Fitch

Abercrombie & Fitch CEO Mike Jeffries is in the hot seat after his controversial 2006 interview resurfaced amid backlash against the company's decision to not carry any larger women's sizes. Reaction has varied from handing out Abercrombie clothing to homeless people to a mock ad campaign to criticism from stars such as Kirstie Alley and Ellen DeGeneres. The company has apologized and met with a teen activist unhappy with the company's policies.

Jeffries' controversial remarks

 

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AP Photo: M. Spencer Green, File
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CVS

CVS pharmacy is facing a $1 million federal discrimination lawsuit after customer Hyun Lee accused a cashier of identifying her by the name "Ching Chong Lee" on a receipt when she picked up photos in February from a CVS store in Egg Harbor, N.J. Lee claimed she was never offered an apology and wants the employee fired. A CVS spokesperson said the company would not comment on the case due to pending litigation.

Video: Watch a news report on the incident

 

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Getty Images: Tom Pennington
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Chick-fil-A

Chick-fil-A found itself in hot water after a photo of receipts referring to Asian customers as "Ching" and "Chong" was shared online. The incident involved college students from the predominantly Asian University of California, Irvine campus near the restaurant in December 2011. The fast-food chain later apologized and said that the employee responsible for the name-calling had been fired.

See a photo of the receipts

 

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Gasp

Manager Matthew Chidgey of the Australian fashion chain Gasp stirred up controversy in September 2011 when his response to an upset shopper went viral. Keara O'Neil had complained about an employee at a Melbourne store, of whom Chidgey said his "only problem is that he is too good at what he does" and accused her of wasting his time. Gasp first defended Chidgey, but the company later issued an apology to O'Neil.

Read their emails

 

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AP Photo: Jeff Roberson, file
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Charter Communications

Cable company Charter Communications upset many customers, including one resident of Pleasant Grove, Ala., after it tried to charge more than $200 for cable boxes that went missing from damaged homes after a tornado outbreak in April 2011. The company later changed its policy to exclude victims of what they deemed "large-scale, catastrophic" storms.

Video: Watch a news report on the controversy

 

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Verizon

A California woman took her complaints about Verizon to The Los Angeles Times after going back and forth with the cell-phone company for several months. After her mother-in-law, Betty Howard, died of breast cancer in December 2010, Marilynn Loveless said her late relative still received a bill from Verizon for $110.80 three months later. Their response? They cut the bill in half and sent it to a collection agency. Verizon eventually waived all charges after columnist David Lazarus brought attention to the situation.

Previous complaints against Verizon

 

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AP Photo: Richard Drew
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Southwest Airlines

Writer-director and prolific Twitter user Kevin Smith took to the popular social network to accuse Southwest Airlines of deeming him "too fat to fly" in February 2010. The man known for playing "Silent Bob" said he normally bought two seats for his flights but was kicked off a plane after accepting a single standby seat. The incident was the inspiration for his question-and-answer special "Too Fat for 40," and the funny man went on to lose 65 pounds.

Read about more "too fat to fly" airline incidents

 

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United Airlines

 Canadian musician Dave Carroll created a music video in 2009 to complain about a United Airlines incident. The singer-songwriter from the band Sons of Maxwell said baggage handlers damaged his favorite $3,500 Taylor guitar to the tune of $1,200 during a flight in March 2008. The video became an Internet sensation, racking up more than 13 million views. United eventually responded — with a $3,000 donation to the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz.

Watch all three "United Breaks Guitars" music videos

 

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Bloomberg via Getty Images: Scott Eells
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AOL

The year 2006 was not a good one for the search engine AOL. The company published users' search queries online in August, but assured them that their identities were protected. However, The New York Times managed to track down one of the users, a 62-year-old woman named Thelma Arnold in Lilburn, Ga. AOL later apologized for the leak. In June, former AOL customer Vincent Ferrari posted a recording of his frustrations with trying to close his account, which echoed charges levied against the company in 2003.

Video: Listen to the call

 

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Comcast

A Comcast repairman in Washington, D.C., fell asleep on a customer's couch in June 2006 while waiting on hold with his own company for more than an hour. The unhappy customer's video of the sleepyhead on YouTube — including captions outlining his complaints and appropriate background music — has accumulated nearly 2 million hits to date. Comcast responded by sending out a team — sans one sleepy repairman — and got his Internet up and running.

Watch the viral video

 

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