President Obama's Cabinet

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Vice President

As President Obama begins his second term, some of his top cabinet members are departing. Here's a look at who is in, who is out and which posts need replacements. See gallery

Joseph R. Biden is serving a second term as vice president.

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Department of State

Former Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., approved by the Senate, is the new secretary of state, having succeeded Hillary Clinton.

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Department of the Treasury

Former White House Chief of Staff Jack Lewconfirmed by the Senate as secretary of treasury, succeeds Timothy Geithner.

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Department of Defense

Former Sen. Chuck Hagel, R-Neb., confirmed by the Senate as secretary of defense, succeeds Leon Panetta.

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Department of Justice

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder remains in the job atop the Department of Justice.

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Department of the Interior

Sally Jewell, the former CEO of outdoor equipment company REI, is the secretary of the interior. She was confirmed by the Senate on April 10, taking over from former secretary Kenneth L. Salazar.

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Department of Agriculture

Thomas J. Vilsack is currently secretary of the Department of Agriculture.

 

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Department of Commerce

On June 25, the Senate confirmed Penny Pritzker as commerce secretary. Pritzker is a billionaire businesswoman who supported Obama's campaigns.

 

 

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Department of Labor

On July 18, the Senate confirmed Thomas E. Perez as secretary of Labor, replacing Hilda Solis. Perez, the former head of the Department of Justice's Civil Rights Division, won confirmation on a 54-46 party-line vote, just days after senators reached an agreement to end filibusters of executive branch nominees, which had created an effective 60-vote threshold for confirmation.

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Department of Health and Human Services

Kathleen Sebelius is the current secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services.

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Department of Housing and Urban Development

Shaun Donovan is currently the secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

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Department of Transportation

On June 27, the Senate confirmed former Charlotte, N.C. Mayor Anthony Foxx as secretary of transportation, replacing Ray LaHood.

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Department of Energy

MIT scientist Ernest Moniz was confirmed to head the Energy Department on May, 16 after Steven Chu stepped down. Obama said Moniz is a "brilliant scientist" who knows how the U.S. can produce more energy and grow the economy. 

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Department of Education

Arne Duncan currently is the secretary of the Department of Education.

 

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Department of Veterans Affairs

Eric K. Shinseki currently is the secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs.

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Department of Homeland Security

Janet Napolitano is the secretary of the Department of Homeland Security. On July 12, Napolitano announced she would step down to take a new job as head of the University of California system. Napolitano is just the third person to head DHS, which was created following the 9/11 attacks. President Obama has yet not named a nominee to replace her.

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White House chief of staff

Denis McDonough was appointed White House chief of staff, replacing Jack Lew, who became treasury secretary.

 

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Environmental Protection Agency

President Obama has nominated EPA veteran Gina McCarthy to run the environmental agency after Lisa Jackson announced she was stepping down. McCarthy currently serves as the EPA's assistant administrator for air and radiation.

AP Photo: Carolyn Kaster
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Office of Management and Budget

Sylvia Mathews Burwell was confirmed by the Senate on April 24 as the new head of the Office of Management and Budget and will likely be a key player in Washington's fiscal fights. She replaces acting OMB director Jeff Zients, who took over on a temporary basis in January.

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Office of the U.S. Trade Representative

On June 20, the Senate confirmed Michael Froman as U.S. Trade Representative. Froman was a former top White House economic advisor and a Harvard Law School classmate of President Obama. He succeeds Ron Kirk.

 

 

 

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U.S. ambassador to the United Nations

On June 5, President Obama nominated Samantha Power, a human rights expert and former White House adviser, to replace Susan Rice at the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. He named Rice as National Security Adviser, a cabinet-level role that does not require Senate confirmation. Rice was briefly considered to replace Hillary Clinton as secretary of state, but withdrew from consideration after she was criticized for her role following the U.S. Consulate attack in Benghazi, Libya

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Council of Economic Advisers

Alan Kreueger, left, is stepping down as chair of Council of Economic Advisers. On May 29, President Obama nominated another longtime economic adviser, Jason Furman, to replace him.

 

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Small Business Administration

Karen Mills is administrator of the Small Business Administration. She announced on Feb. 11 that she was leaving her post.